Did Republicans Win the Battle but Lose the War with Kavanaugh?

The Senate voted to confirm the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to a seat on the Supreme Court, 50-48, much to the chagrin and disappointment to the Democrats, Progressives, and other detractors. Protests are still ongoing.

This is a clear victory for Trump and the GOP, who have now placed two highly conservative judges on SCOTUS in less than 2 years in office.

The problem is there is a large cloud of controversy with Kavanaugh, with the accusations of past sexual assault, accepting and passing on stolen secret documents, and the recent hyper partisan statement he made at his second hearing. He basically declared himself to be a victim, and now vengeful enemy to Democrats and the left. This was not an emotion induced outburst due to a momentary loss of control. These were written statements that he had plenty of time to consider and ponder on as he wrote them down in preparation :

“This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election, fear that has been unfairly stoked about my judicial record; revenge on behalf of the Clintons and millions of dollars in money from outside left-wing opposition groups.

This is a circus. The consequences will extend long past my nomination. The consequences will be with us for decades. This grotesque character assassination will dissuade confident and good people of all political persuasions from serving our country, and as we all know, in the political system of the early 2000s, what goes around comes around.”

What goes around, comes around? How can that not be interpreted as anything other than a threat of retaliation? How is that response anywhere close to displaying the characteristics of a non partisan judge?

Kavanaugh will be the most openly partisan SCOTUS appointment in modern history, which is sure to rile the Democrats, even without all the other baggage he brings with him.

But did it have to go this way? Trump has a long list of vetted conservative candidates that could have been appointed without nearly so much controversy. As an example, Neil Gorsuch’s appointment was a sleeper compared to this.

If Kavanaugh had lost the confirmation, the Republicans would have been angered and riled up for action, just in time for November elections. Trump would still be able to pick another candidate from his conservative list even if the Dems gained seats in the Senate. I don’t believe the Dems would have ramped up the partisanship by holding a court appointment open for two years, which would be double the time McConnell did to Obama with not allowing Merrick Garland to have a hearing.

Kavanaugh losing the nomination would have been a bigger boost to Republican turn out during a time when historically, Republicans lose seats.

But with Kavanaugh’s win, Dems and women who related to Ford are even more energized than they were before to make their opinions heard, especially under the atmosphere of such a widely broadcast battle along partisan/sexist lines.

This could very well result in a much bigger blue wave than what would have occurred with a Kanavaugh loss.

The Republicans are expecting the loss of the House to the Dems, but now the Senate may also be in play as well.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Did Republicans Win the Battle but Lose the War with Kavanaugh?

  1. I do think the Republicans and Republican base have been more energized to fight, and to win. Democrats , as usual…. do not have the time to vote ( just one hour out of 365 days ) Most of them do not even know who the VP is. We just think we are connecting because we’re loud and passionate, but we’re not. My 20 year old cousin and her friends… they don’t care. They don’t know what’s going on.

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    • With the amount of huge turnout for protests by young people, I think they will turn out in greater percentages compared to usual, and that will make a big difference. Republicans only make up about 24% of the total US voting electorate, so even with enthused Trump supporters, their impact is limited. I also know of Republicans with “buyers remorse” over Trump’s failure to follow through on his campaign promises. This is why historically all presidents move to center and try to court both sides, because core support isn’t enough to win. Trump is bucking that theory, and we will see in Nov if his strategy works. Based on current polling…it doesn’t look like it will.

      Liked by 1 person

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